1862 March 30 Camp Rappahannock, Virginia

Camp Rappahannock
March 30” 1862
My own darling Wife
Yesterday morning Genl Elzey sent
me out with two companies to occupy the
ground on the river bank imediately [sic] op
posite the enimy [sic] with instructions to
resist their efforts to cross &c and I
established my head quarters in the house
formerly occupied by Genl Elzey and
deployed my men as skirmishers along
the line occupied by our men in the
fight of the day before [28 March].  about 11’ oclock
the enimies [sic] pickets disappeared & from the
appearance of the smoke of their camp fires I concluded that
the enimy [sic] had fallen back & sent word
to to [sic] Genl Ewel.  one hour later three reg-
iments of our cavalry crossed the river
& found that they [the enemy] had fallen back &
they followed them to Warrenton Junction
taking 20 prisoners & returned yesterday evening
[page 2]
The fight [of 28 March] occured [sic] in this way.  The
enimy [sic] in strong forced [sic] pressed closely
on Genl Stuart & appeared on the
hills on the other side of the river
in a moment after Stuart & his men
had got over and opened on them
with shot & shell.  at this moment
the bridge had just been fired and
might have been carried by the enimy [sic]
but our division was called out
& formed in the high ground on
this side  our brigade resting on the
right & our regiment deployed as
skirmishers.  the Md Reg on the right
left & opposite the ford near the
bridge  Nearly the whole of their fire
was directed against our brigade
and our regiment more than any
other & the right wing under my
command decidedly the hotest [sic].  the
shell & ball flew all around us
It was so hot that I ordered the right
wing to advance & threw them forward
[page 3]
some 30 or 40 yds & thus we avoided
their range  it is most providential
that none of us were hurt while in
this position, which we held until
near dark when two pieces of our
artillery being disabled we fell
back about 1 ½ miles & again formed
in line of battle & there we still
are with half rations & nearly knee
deep in mud.  my men are in better
condition than any of them – all
are under shelter but those on duty
as we were retiring our little Par
son was knocked from his horse by
a shell but not seriously hurt.
I dont know how long we will
remain here – our wagons are at Cul-
peper & I suppose we will soon
join them, but do not certainly
know anything about it.  bad as I want
to get to Orange I dont think we
ought to leave here.  I sent Billy up
yesterday for my horse & clothes  I hope
[page 4]
he will get back tomorrow or
next day.  Dont be uneasy about
me darling, that dont make it any
better.  There is no likely hood of the
enimy [sic] advanctadvancing for several
days to come – they cant do it – in
the present condition of the roads,
nor do I think we can do much towards
getting away  our wagons are ten miles
ahead is one thing in our favor if
any retreat is attempted by us.
  Take care of yourself – be a good girl
tell little Jennie not to cry so much
& Jim & Lizzie not to eat every thing
up so Papa will have none when
he comes to see us.
 Most devotedly & affectionately
ETH Warren
“Camp Rappahannock”, heading – ‘Near Rappahannock Station, present-day Remington, Fauquier Co.’
“Genl Elzey”, line 1 & 7 – ‘Arnold Elzey, Confederate general, commanded the brigade in which the 10th Virginia Infantry served.’
“Genl Ewel” , line 14 – ‘Richard S. Ewell, Confederate general, commanded the division in which Elzey’s Brigade served.’
“Genl Stuart”, page 3, line 3 –
“Stuart”, page 3, line 5 –  ‘Both referred to James Ewell Brown JEB Stuart, Confederate cavalry general.’
“the Md Reg”, page 2, line 14 – ‘1st Maryland Infantry.  This unit served in the same brigade with the 10th Virginia Infantry.’
“our little Parson”, page 3, lines 13& 14 – ‘Joseph P. Hyde, Chaplain, 10th Virginia Infantry.  In fact, Chaplain Hyde was injured more than Warren noted.  In addition to a concussion, his right leg was paralyzed.  Chaplain Hyde did not return to duty until 17 June 1863.  During most of his time absent from the regiment, Hyde served on the staff of the Wesleyan Female Institute, Staunton.’
“Billy”, page 3, line 22 – ‘William Rolston, private, Company H, 10th Virginia Infantry.’
“little Jennie”, page 4, line 13 – ‘Warren’s youngest daughter Virginia ‘Jennie’ Watson, born 26 February 1862.’
“Jim”, page 4, line 14 – ‘Warren’s five year-old son James M.’
“Lizzie”, page 4, line 14 – ‘Warren’s seven year-old daughter.’
“ETH Warren”, page 4, signature – ‘Edward Tiffin Harrison Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel, 10th Virginia Infantry.’
[transcription by John P. Mann, IV]

MSS 7786-g

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